On pleasing “everyone”

On pleasing “everyone”

Write a book.

Build a jewelry box.

Design a t-shirt.

Produce a song.

Start a blog.

You can be certain of two facts: 1) Someone will like it. 2) Everyone won’t like it. Because everyone doesn’t like anything. Yes, even football, Christmas, and The Grand Canyon, there will always be someone out there who won’t like it.

So why even try to please everyone? That’s how companies like Apple have lost their way. Their target market: the designers, producers, engineers, are no longer top of Apple’s mind. It’s now all about the iPhone. That’s what appeals to the masses. That’s where the stakeholders see the biggest return. That’s where innovation stops—when you try to market to “everyone.”

It’s okay if people don’t like or agree with what you do. Critics criticize—it’s what they do. Why try to appeal to the common denominator when your tribe is already drinking your Kool-Aid?

Is it greed? Is it ego?

Remember, riches in the niches. Be okay with only a small number of people liking it. The world is a big place, but the internet levels the playing field. Your niche is probably a lot bigger than you think. Stay true to what you do. Ignore the haters, serve your true fans.

Selective responsibility

Selective responsibility

The professional amateur

The professional amateur